2AM Creative Break.
Hey kiddoes! Just a quick post in the midst of this summertime madness!  The Russian exchange students start classes tomorrow, so I’ll be helping out with that, so I’m trying to get work done on my second case presentation. 
Because getting signatures from parents for art releases is really difficult when working with children in an RTF, I’ve opted (for both cases) to do response art. 
Know that that’s an option during practicum, and is probably really wise to do, to help you process your feelings and reactions to your clients and patients.
Okay, thats it for now! Enjoy your summers!

Hey kiddoes! Just a quick post in the midst of this summertime madness!
The Russian exchange students start classes tomorrow, so I’ll be helping out with that, so I’m trying to get work done on my second case presentation.

Because getting signatures from parents for art releases is really difficult when working with children in an RTF, I’ve opted (for both cases) to do response art.

Know that that’s an option during practicum, and is probably really wise to do, to help you process your feelings and reactions to your clients and patients.

Okay, thats it for now! Enjoy your summers!

ejlandsman:

I compiled some personal tactics and crowd sourced DIY remedies for the sads (clinical term) into a mini comic! Enjoy xoxo

ladyladyington:

We made bowls over the past two days.

Hey guys, it’s been a while! 

This week I’ve been participating in an expressive art therapies workshop that’s being taught by one of my supervisors from my first (previous) practicum site! We began this project yesterday after an exercise in letting go. 

We made clay totems (water based clay), to represent something we would like to let go. I don’t have photos of that because each of the totems was uniquely personal to everyone, myself included. After creating them, we took them out into the woods at the university and hid them to let the elements take care of them as they would. 

Then we began a project of creating - a starting fresh. These bowls were made by using plaster strips being placed over balloons that were our form base. We were able to use the strips as we were able to add texture, or a base or a rim - as we would. Today we continued working with them by painting or otherwise decorating them. Kim (our instructor) used modge podge to put comic strips on hers, and a few of my classmates used tissue paper to decorate, or even other media to adorn their bowls. 

I chose to stick with my comfortable medium of paint, but I let the process guide me. I began with a purple/blue color, which began to evolve into the galactic colors that you see. I added some galaxies and the Pisces constellation for some added cheek (I’m a Pisces), but other than that I really enjoyed making this. 

We discussed what we might use the bowl for. Since this task was so much about creation and starting new, and the themes of nebulae, and the cosmos really speak of creation to me, I’m going to try and put creative or inspirational thoughts and ideas in the bowl. It’s now sitting on top of my TV where it’s easily accessible, and in the general area where I usually make art. 

So, here’s a directive/example for you guys! Cheers! 
Hopefully I’ll be more active over the next year - spring was just a rough semester over all and there wasn’t a lot of art making on my part - something I hope to change this Fall semester, especially since I’ll start my studio art classes! 

julieeenguyeen:

perfuckedtion:

aniggainrio:

After a 20-minute flight over the city of New York, Stephen Wiltshire, diagnosed with autism, draws the whole town with only his memory.

That is the most amazing thing I’ve ever seen

Saw a documentary over this, he’s amazing!

julieeenguyeen:

perfuckedtion:

aniggainrio:

After a 20-minute flight over the city of New York, Stephen Wiltshire, diagnosed with autism, draws the whole town with only his memory.

That is the most amazing thing I’ve ever seen

Saw a documentary over this, he’s amazing!

ejlandsman:

I compiled some personal tactics and crowd sourced DIY remedies for the sads (clinical term) into a mini comic! Enjoy xoxo

So, being in grad school and also being in a helping profession, my professors and those who are further along in the program, stress self care. It’s so important to remember to take care of yourself in a medical or mental health field (or any field where you’re working with people who are working on themselves). It’s hard to not take it all on yourself, and it becomes easy to lose yourself in your work and burn out. 
When I was 19, I was working with children with psychiatric disorders and I pushed myself into my work so hard, and being that my mother worked at the same school, it was so hard to separate myself from my work. Now, at the age of (almost) 24, I think that the concept of self care is so important and that everyone needs to practice it!

Hello, all!
I thought that I would post my first directive on here in lieu of writing up the process note that I should be writing for it (still counts as work)!
On Thursday, it was my turn to run the group task in my group process class. The directive I wrote up was one of my own invention, where participants would be creating their own spirit animal! After checking in the with group by asking them to identify a high point or something they were looking forward to that day, I began the session by reading the Urban Dictionary definition of a spirit animal just to clarify that it a) did not necessarily have to an animal, or b) it did not necessarily have to be a real animal. 
The structure of the art-making process was closer to that of an open studio where members were allowed to choose whatever material they wanted in order to create their animal. Some sculpted out of Sculpey or water-based clay, and others created a two dimensional image, by cutting paper, or drawing (and in some cases both). 
The primary, therapeutic goal of a task like this is to have the participants find shared, positive qualities with their spirit animal. Towards the end of the art-making time, I asked them to think about the personality of their creation, and during processing I asked them to name at least two positive characteristics that they had in common with their image. There’s a psychic distance that is allowed with this symbolic representation of the participant, which encourages an objective assessment of a person’s positive traits that may be harder for some people if they were to, for example, make a puppet of themselves, or create a self portrait. 
This directive may be particularly successful with children and adolescents as it can call for a certain degree of imagination or playfulness that may be harder to achieve with adults. 
I did this again, the following day, at my practicum site (population: adult inpatient), and it was a good Friday afternoon activity! I varied my processing question at the end, instead asking what it was that their spirit animal would say to its creator. This was also successful, as one patient that I have been working with for several weeks had a very positive message from her animal (she’s slated for discharge in the beginning of this coming week), and another patient, a recent re-admission, had a statement from her creation that suggested her desire for strength and support in several ways. 
I hope this was helpful/informative! Let me know if you guys enjoy this sort of thing and want more! I may have another one in store after Wednesday!

Hello, all!

I thought that I would post my first directive on here in lieu of writing up the process note that I should be writing for it (still counts as work)!

On Thursday, it was my turn to run the group task in my group process class. The directive I wrote up was one of my own invention, where participants would be creating their own spirit animal! 
After checking in the with group by asking them to identify a high point or something they were looking forward to that day, I began the session by reading the Urban Dictionary definition of a spirit animal just to clarify that it a) did not necessarily have to an animal, or b) it did not necessarily have to be a real animal. 

The structure of the art-making process was closer to that of an open studio where members were allowed to choose whatever material they wanted in order to create their animal. Some sculpted out of Sculpey or water-based clay, and others created a two dimensional image, by cutting paper, or drawing (and in some cases both). 

The primary, therapeutic goal of a task like this is to have the participants find shared, positive qualities with their spirit animal. Towards the end of the art-making time, I asked them to think about the personality of their creation, and during processing I asked them to name at least two positive characteristics that they had in common with their image. 
There’s a psychic distance that is allowed with this symbolic representation of the participant, which encourages an objective assessment of a person’s positive traits that may be harder for some people if they were to, for example, make a puppet of themselves, or create a self portrait. 

This directive may be particularly successful with children and adolescents as it can call for a certain degree of imagination or playfulness that may be harder to achieve with adults. 

I did this again, the following day, at my practicum site (population: adult inpatient), and it was a good Friday afternoon activity! I varied my processing question at the end, instead asking what it was that their spirit animal would say to its creator. This was also successful, as one patient that I have been working with for several weeks had a very positive message from her animal (she’s slated for discharge in the beginning of this coming week), and another patient, a recent re-admission, had a statement from her creation that suggested her desire for strength and support in several ways. 

I hope this was helpful/informative! 
Let me know if you guys enjoy this sort of thing and want more! I may have another one in store after Wednesday!

mywhisperedcolors:

Slowly replacing the negative thoughts with colors and beautiful things.

mywhisperedcolors:

Slowly replacing the negative thoughts with colors and beautiful things.

whisperingf0rests:

artbymoga:

Most importantly: you’re stronger than you think.

WHY DOES THIS NOT HAVE MORE NOTES

Yesterday, Edith Kramer died at the age of 98 in her home in Austria. 
Anyone familiar with the field of Art Therapy knows just how much of a loss this is for the field, as she was one of our founding “mothers”. She will be missed, but the contributions that she made to the field of psychology in the form of Art Therapy were monumental, and in that she will be well remembered. 

Yesterday, Edith Kramer died at the age of 98 in her home in Austria. 

Anyone familiar with the field of Art Therapy knows just how much of a loss this is for the field, as she was one of our founding “mothers”. She will be missed, but the contributions that she made to the field of psychology in the form of Art Therapy were monumental, and in that she will be well remembered. 

shiroyanagi:

whoufflesoufflegirl:

the-treble:

willowpedia:

crazymolerat36:

ewitsmichelle:

not just followers, everyone.

same

I’m here if any of you need to talk<3

Argentina Suicide Hotlines

Armenia Suicide Hotlines

Australia Suicide Hotlines

Austria Suicide Hotlines

Barbados Suicide Hotlines

Belgium Suicide Hotlines

Botswana Suicide Hotlines

Brazil Suicide Hotlines

Canada Suicide Hotlines

China Suicide Hotlines

Croatia Suicide Hotlines

Cyprus Suicide Hotlines

Denmark Suicide Hotlines

Egypt Suicide Hotlines

Estonia Suicide Hotlines

Fiji Suicide Hotlines

Finland Suicide Hotlines

France Suicide Hotlines

Germany Suicide Hotlines

Ghana Suicide Hotlines

Gibraltar Suicide Hotlines

Hong Kong Suicide Hotlines

Hungary Suicide Hotlines

India Suicide Hotlines

Ireland Suicide Hotlines

Israel Suicide Hotlines

Italy Suicide Hotlines

Japan Suicide Hotlines

Liberia Suicide Hotlines

Lithuania Suicide Hotlines

Malaysia Suicide Hotlines

Malta Suicide Hotlines

Mauritius Suicide Hotlines

Namibia Suicide Hotlines

Netherlands Suicide Hotlines

New Zealand Suicide Hotlines

Norway Suicide Hotlines

Paupua New Guinea Suicide Hotlines

Philippines Suicide Hotlines

Poland Suicide Hotlines

Portugal Suicide Hotlines

Russian Federation Suicide Hotlines

Somoa Suicide Hotlines

Serbia Suicide Hotlines

Singapore Suicide Hotlines

South Africa Suicide Hotlines

South Korea Suicide Hotlines

Spain Suicide Hotlines

Sri Lanka Suicide Hotlines

St. Vincent Suicide Hotlines

Sudan Suicide Hotlines

Sweden Suicide Hotlines

Switzerland Suicide Hotlines

Taiwan Suicide Hotlines

Thailand Suicide Hotlines

Tobago Suicide Hotlines

Tonga Suicide Hotlines

Trinidad and Tobago Suicide Hotlines

Turkey Suicide Hotlines

Ukraine Suicide Hotlines

United Kingdom Suicide Hotlines

United States Suicide Hotlines

Zimbabwe Suicide Hotlines

The best part is, this post actually does something, it offers support, unlike one of those useless “reblog if you care” posts.

Yooo my country’s not in this list so here’s the suicide hotline for Indonesia: (+62)21-500454

Reblog this around!